Kentucky custody statutes have been modified so that there is now a rebuttable presumption that both parents share joint custody of their child with equal parenting time. The statutes set forth a rebuttable presumption, meaning that if a parent does not want there to be joint custody and equal parenting time that parent must prove to the Court that it is in best interests of the parties’ child that a more traditional arrangement, such as one parent having primary residential custody of the child and the other parent seeing the child every other weekend and perhaps one evening during the week, is in the best interests of the child. If the parent wanting primary residential custody of the child cannot prove that it is in the best interests of the child for him or her to have the child most of the time, the Court is now required by law to set an equal parenting time arrangement. The parent wanting primary residential custody may want to show that the other parent does not have much of an interest in the child, that the child may be unsafe with that parent, or that the other parent’s work schedule makes it impossible for there to be an equal parenting time arrangement. The parent wanting equal time with his or her child just has to show that he or she has the time to devote to the child and that he or she cares enough about the child to keep the child safe.